By adding a few more lines of code to the official React Tutorial.

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Whether you already know React, or are just starting to learn it, you’ve probably encountered the official Tic-Tac-Toe tutorial at some point. The end result is pretty neat — a fully functional Tic-Tac-Toe UI with history tracking:

The official final result linked from the official React Tic-Tac-Toe tutorial.

But you can only have so much fun playing against yourself (or a friend). Let’s spice it up with some intelligence! By adding a little bit more code, you can add an unbeatable AI opponent:


Using an Alpine based image is NOT the only way!

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After much sweat (and possibly tears), you’ve finally finished building your web application. Now it’s time to show the world your awesome work by containerizing it and deploying it somewhere.

“Easy. I’ll just write a simple Dockerfile that uses the base node:<version> image from Docker Hub,” you said to yourself. You do just that, build the Docker image, and test your web application locally — everything looks great! But then you decide to check the size of your Docker image, and you see that it’s…on the order of gigabytes! The size must be reducible right? …


Previewable on Chrome today, and coming soon to other browsers

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The Canvas API provides a way for drawing graphics on the web using JavaScript and the HTML <canvas> element, and largely focuses on 2D graphics. As a general bitmap manipulation framework, it can be used for animation, game graphics, real-time video processing, data visualization, image manipulation, and much more.

But alas, quoting the MDN Web Docs: “The Canvas API is extremely powerful, but not always simple to use.”

This is because Canvas 2D is a relatively low-level raster graphics API, where visuals need to be manipulated at the pixel level, and interactions need to be managed manually. To draw a…


Learn to deploy any containerized application on the decentralized cloud

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I recently came upon a promising blockchain-based alternative to traditional cloud platforms called Akash. Akash Network is building the first decentralized cloud (DeCloud) computing marketplace, which enables any computer with unused compute cycles to become a cloud provider, and allows developers to easily and securely access cloud compute at costs much lower than (allegedly up to 10x!) those provided by current market providers such as AWS, Google Cloud, and Microsoft Azure. If you’re not familiar with Decentralized Cloud (DeCloud) or Akash, you can check out their website, their whitepapers, their blogs, and other blogs. …


Machine Learning on Akash DeCloud (Part 3/3): ML Application Deployment on a Decentralized Cloud

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In Part 1 of my three-part series chronicling machine learning on Akash Network, we deployed to Akash a full Jupyter environment with a Python kernel and TensorFlow installed, and used it to train a convolutional neural network (CNN) for handwritten digit recognition on the MNIST dataset. In Part 2, we bundled the model with TensorFlow Serving to expose a REST API for model inference, and showed that we can host that on Akash as well.

In this final part, we will expand upon our project and deploy a web application to Akash that utilizes our REST API to classify user…


Machine Learning on Akash DeCloud (Part 2/3): ML Model Inference on a Decentralized Cloud

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In Part 1 of my three-part series chronicling machine learning on Akash Network, we deployed a full Jupyter environment with a Python kernel and TensorFlow installed to Akash, and trained a convolutional neural network (CNN) for handwritten digit recognition on the MNIST dataset.

In this guide, we will take the trained model, bundle it with TensorFlow Serving to expose a REST API for model inference, and deploy the whole thing to Akash. In Part 3, we will also deploy a web application to Akash that utilizes this REST API to classify user drawn digits.

Prerequisites

The Docker image used in this…


Machine Learning on Akash DeCloud (Part 1/3): Training ML Models on a Decentralized Cloud

Photo by Florian Krumm on Unsplash

In my previous post titled Guide to Deploying Applications to Akash DeCloud, I described the first blockchain-based alternative to traditional cloud platforms called Akash Network and detailed the relatively frictionless process anyone can follow to deploy their own applications to Akash. TL;DR, if you have a containerized application, and have performed the initial Akash setup, deploying to Akash simply involves writing a small configuration file and executing a couple of commands.

Over the course of the recent Akashian Challenge 3 that debuted the beta version of the Akash deployment platform, developers from around the world successfully deployed and submitted a…


Recently, I came upon Akash, the first decentralized cloud computing marketplace. If you’re not yet familiar with Decentralized Cloud (DeCloud) or Akash, I encourage you to check out their website, their whitepapers, their blogs, and other blogs. The project is still faily young, but their recent Akasian Challenge 3 showcases a pretty impressive preview of their deployment platform. Just as how one can deploy a containerized application on Amazon Web Services (AWS), one can in theory deploy the same containerized application on Akash.

In this guide, I’m going to show you how easy it is to deploy a containerized Augur…

Wilson Louie

Software Engineer | Machine Learning Enthusiast | Web Developer | Computational Biologist | Constantly learning and eager to spread the knowledge.

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